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Buying Your Home
Making a Home Buying Offer

Once you’ve found your ideal house, it’s time to get started with the financial and contractual side of the purchase. Let your CENTURY 21 Judge Fite Company real estate professional guide you through this process. Purchase contracts vary in length and terms from state to state, and sometimes within a state.

Multiple offers on the same home are not uncommon, so you may only get one chance to make an offer that the seller will consider. That’s why it’s important to think carefully about your strategy. In most cases it is better to have your real estate professional present the offer. If you have any personal interaction with the homeowner, avoid sharing any information about your move, your current housing status, financial status or your feelings about their property – positive or negative. You and the seller have different goals, so it’s important to consult with your real estate professional first.


How Much Do You Offer?

Your CENTURY 21 Judge Fite Company real estate professional can help you find out what other homes have sold for in the area and how much money you might have to put into repairs or renovations. These considerations should be a factor along with the amount you’re comfortable spending.

In addition to sale prices of other comparable homes, there are several ways you can come up with a winning bid. For example:

  • The condition of the house. Is the home in move-in condition, in need of paint and other cosmetic improvements, or a fixer-upper that needs real work?
  • The market. If you are in a buyer’s market — where there are more homes for sale than there are people to buy them — prices are probably stable or falling. If you are in a seller’s market — where there are more buyers looking for homes than there are homes for sale — prices are probably moving upward.
  • Your ceiling. If you have a credit pre-approval, you know how much you can borrow for your home purchase. Of course, you may not be comfortable paying as much as you’ve been approved to borrow, so think carefully about your financial situation before making an offer.

Next, decide how much you are willing to pay for a home. Remember, the advertised price of a house is just a starting point – it may take quite a bit of negotiating to arrive at a final cost.


Applying for a Mortgage

Once you’ve made the decision to become a homeowner and picked the house, you may need to apply for a loan. This process might seem daunting, but your lender will guide you through it. The process will be even easier if you know what to expect, and our team at Cardinal Financial can help you prepare for it.

Here are the high-level loan application steps:

Prepare required documents

  • Two years of employment history, current employment status and salary are needed. Employment letters can be used to explain gaps in employment.
  • Two years of W-2s (this does not apply if self-employed) and tax returns allow the lender to be sure that your salary is high enough to make the mortgage payments every month.
  • Most recent pay stubs for the last 30 days – this tells the lender that you’re still earning money similar to the amount on your tax returns (this does not apply if self-employed, but the lender will likely require a profit and loss statement).
  • List of assets, including bank statements, so the lender knows that you have the money to cover the down payment, closing costs and a reasonable emergency.

Submit the application

  • Once you’ve prepared the required documents, the first step with the lender is to apply for the home loan. Of course, you will need to provide personal information, as well as information about the property you’ll be purchasing, such as the address and estimated purchase price.

Provide your documents

  • Submit your documents, such as pay stubs, W-2s, bank statements and employment history.

Buying a Home With Cash

Though most buyers don’t buy a home with all cash, anyone considering such a move may be wondering how it’s done. Because all cash buyers sidestep the time-consuming loan qualification process, the deal can close very quickly. The primary advantage of buying a home with cash is completely avoiding mortgage interest. Buyers also save money that would be spent on loan origination fees, required appraisal, some closing costs and various other charges imposed by the lender.